Resources for talking to child about difficult situations.


fredmeme

Resources for information on how to talk to your child about difficult situations:

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/family-life/Media/Pages/Talking-To-Children-About-Tragedies-and-Other-News-Events.aspx

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/healthy-living/emotional-wellness/Building-Resilience/Pages/How-to-Support-Your-Childs-Resilience-in-a-Time-of-Crisis.aspx

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/healthy-living/emotional-wellness/Pages/How-Talk-to-Children-After-Act-Terrorism.aspx

http://www.nctsn.org/sites/default/files/assets/pdfs/csts_sense_of_safety.pdf

http://www.nctsn.org/sites/default/files/assets/pdfs/talking_to_children_about_the_shooting.pdf

 

From the Association of Children’s Museums:

Resources for Helping Kids Cope
Children and adolescents experience trauma differently from adults and from one another.
Below are tips and resources on how children’s museums can help guide the discussion after an event occurs.
Tips on How to Help Kids Cope:
* Allow children to discuss their experiences – children need a safe, accepting environment to discuss their feelings.
* Offer reassurance through physical closeness – children may need extra hugs, smiles and
hand-holding.
* Maintain structure – children need consistency and security during their day, especially
when the world around them seems confusing or unpredictable, or when adults are
preoccupied or upset.
* Respond to children’s interest in talking about the disaster – children gain a sense of
control by talking about things that bother or confuse them. Talking with a supportive
adult can help them clarify their feelings.
* Remind parents to make sure children aren’t over – exposed to media coverage of the
disaster – more than any other action avoiding media coverage will protect children
from confusing and disturbing images.